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resources committee will hold a conference on capitol hill to talk about energy priorities. she will also take questions from reporters. she outlined her plan at the annual meeting of the national association of regulatory utility commissioners. here is a bit of what she had to said. >> in our report, we declare five principals in addition to energy -- i am trying to make this release symbol for everybody for the morning fog of monday. energy is good and then there are five principles. it is in our national interest to make energy abundant, affordable, colleen, diverse, and secure. i have even put them in alphabetical order for ease of memory. [laughter] no acronyms this morning, alphabetical is good. let's talk about abundance -- as a standard of living rises, demand will continue to rise and anyone who has experienced a black out, it is amazing how this blackout last out -- last night ties into everything i have to say this morning. [laughter] anyone who has experienced a super bowl black out or a gasoline shortage does not need an explanation of the value of energy abundance. we should
for certainty and policy decisions. >> earlier today, the ranking member of the senate energy committee, lisa murkowski releaser blueprint for congressional energy policy, which includes drilling in the arctic wildlife refuge also proven keystone xl pipeline. she also discuss climate change issues and why it's important to find common ground in passing future legislation. part of the annual meeting of the national association of regulatory utility commissioners, this is half an hour. [applause] >> thank you and good morning. it's -- i don't know, am i looking at a group of non-football fans? [laughter] i have to tell you, one of the benefits of being from the last to and watching something like the super bowl is our super bowl begins at 2:00 in the afternoon and you're done by 6:00, 630 clock until the kids it's time to do your homework. back here, this thing goes on all night. so i don't know. it showed me out a little bit this morning, but we have the 35 minute reprieve or we could go into a little homework done. so worked for me. i don't know about you. i am honored to be with you yet agai
energy policy. >> i have the book. you have all been waiting for it and take you for giving me the opportunity to talk a little bit about what we have been doing on the energy committee for the past year in an effort to really focus on where we have been with energy policy and really helping to move forward in a way that is not the same old same old, but really real imagining and refocusing where we should be has been an important opportunity for us to really put some considered thought into the proposal. what you have in front of you is better than airplane reading. there are some suggestions in this energy 2020 document that people will look at and they will argue and they will say -- that is one person's view. that is true, that is true. but while we are trying to do is not give you a legislative package starting with initiatives that we are going to kind of clicked off as we move forward. this is really designed to be a discussion blueprint. we want to try to change the conversation. one of the reasons we have to think about changing the conversation is because the energy p
administration has been getting called out for picking winners and losers in the energy sector, mostly losers. a new bill would eliminate all of the energy, all of the energy tax credits. would that make it even playing field for people in that this is? running me now, republican congressman of kansas superposed the bill. congressman, welcome to the show. are you trying to accomplish with this? >> several things, first of all. thank you for having me on the show and talk about this. this is about affordable energy for the folks in kansas and california. affordable energy that they can depend on and rely on. our tax cut has become one that favors folks with a political ties and not those customers. in so many energy companies to get back to doing what they're supposed to do, creating value through finding customers, not political patrons. my legislation does just that, getting rid of every single energy tax credit in the entire code. i am all for it. we should close these loopholes for wind and the algae and tax credits totalling guesstimated of the mall and level the playing field. gerri: you
, that is a great question. triet its current to metastasize tree we are seeing growth in the energy sector through oil and gas you are always finding new fields. ghana is an example in the industry that keeps booming. there are other places around west africa and in this region there's a potential for the oil and gas of in certain quadrants between the borders of mali and more tammie as a you have companies, western companies that are out looking for this. exxonmobil, vp, offshore, all these companies are out there so you have the westerners operating in the region, and if you start seeing the tax like the one that we saw in algeria, that is when to cause some impact economically you are going to see that. the other thing is there is -- i will use france as an example from the four ret base you have 10% of the french population is of some percentage in north africa whether it is first, second, third, fourth generation. you have individuals from within these groups that are sympathetic to the cause or the islamist cause in the region. if you keep this unchecked what you have is a migration flow of
the house stands adjourned until 10:00 a.m. for morning hour debate. >> later, senate energy committee ranking member senator murkowski reveals his ideas for energy policy. then john kerry speaks to state department employees. >> a single thing that coolidge did that we want to remember is, when he left office, the budget was lower than when he came in. that is the story for us now. how did he do that? the economy grew a lot. maybe more than three percent sometimes. unemployment was below five percent. the budget was balanced due to his own money. had he managed to keep -- the budget go lower. how did that help the economy? he got the government out of the way of the economy. >> tracing the life of the 30th president of the united states in oakland coolidge." "coolidge."t -- oh quot >> they heard from newark mayor cory booker immigrants leaders. democratic senator joe manchin of west virginia and former gop presidential candidate jon huntsman. this is two hours. >> ladies and gentlemen, please welcome marianne huntsman and abby huntsman. [applause] family"] ♪ >> we are family. we are
: coming up next, the latest cabinet member announces he is leaving the obama administration. what energy secretary steven khu wants to do instead. >> also "good morning america" takes over the french quarter. reporter indicate indicated will join us live from new orleans well, well, well. growing up, we didn't have u-verse. we couldn't record four shows at the same time. in my day, you were lucky if you could record two shows. and if mom was recording her dumb show and dad was recording his dumb show then, by george, that's all we watched. and we liked it! today's kids got it so good. [ male announcer ] get u-verse tv for just $19 a month for 1 year when you bundle tv and internet. rethink possible. >> carolyn: this morning, president obama is calling on congress to put aside their differences to reduce the deficit and promote economic growth. >> what we need instead is balanced approach. of course, let's cut what we can't afford but let's make the investments we can't afford to live without. the things that will help america compete for the best jobs and new industries. >> carolyn: pres
and in their neighborhoods, and economics will always play a role in that. next, think about energy and climate change. managing the world's energy supplies in a way that minimizes conflict and supports economic growth while protecting the future of our planet is one of the greatest challenges of our time so we are using both high- level international diplomacy and grass-roots partnerships to curb carbon emissions and other causes of climate change. we've created a new bureau at the state department focused on energy diplomacy as well as new partnerships like the u.s.-e.u. energy council. we've worked extensively with the iraqis to support their energy sector because it is critical to their economy and stability. we have intensified our efforts to resolve energy disputes from the south china sea to the eastern mediterranean. this has been helped significantly by the increase in our own domestic production. as iranian oil has gone offline, other oil has gone online. levers of power and values we cannot afford to ignore. universal rights exist. governments are obligated to protect them. we're at the fro
's natural gas under my town. it's a game changer. ♪ it means cleaner, cheaper american-made e energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it. design the wells to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the most advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ formerrts that jackson jr.jesse with thed a plea deal justice department is connection of misuse ofges campaign funds. he reportedly repaid the government hundreds of thousands of dollars he spent on items, including a luxury watch and air for a female friend as well furniture for his home in washington. a judge will determine whether gets jail time. >> here is a reminder that just about anybody's e-mail can be hacked. e-mail accounts from the family george w.president was breached. rebecca cooper has been following this story. details of those e-mails are internet, right? >> the bush family is not commenting. this is in hands of law enforcement. secret service did confirm that this is a criminal inves
it a more perfect union our way. tonight, i feel this energy and hope. when i began in new york, my metaphor was i was a prisoner of hope. the challenges looked so great. every month, my staff would come in with a new problem that we did not realize was there. i wouldn't look at them and say, i am a prisoner of hope. [laughter] seven years as the mayor of the city of newark, where we have ushered in our biggest development in our economy, for the first time in 60 years, our population has grown and is not declining, i have changed my metaphor. this nation has taught me that i need not be a prisoner of hope. the possibilities in this country, the promise of people coming together, has changed my metaphor. my experience in my great city has changed my metaphor. now i am hopeful unhinged. there is nothing we cannot do. [applause] i end with a question that has been asked since the war of 1812, when a man standing off the coast of our country watching bombs bursting in air penned these words that form a question that we must answer in this generation, that we must rise and tell the truth of who
. >> "washington journal" continues. michael're back with burgess, a republican and vice chairman of the energy and commerce subcommittee. thanks for talking to our viewers. guest: thanks for having me. host: republicans are saying to avoid the automatic spending cuts, we need entitlement reform on the table. president obama said yesterday if we cannot agree to something long-term like entitlement reform, let's do something short-term. do you agree? guest: no. president obama should be talking about the next sequester, because this one is happening. it was postponed to march 1 on the first and january. this is a promise that we made, the congress and the president made to the american people in order to get our fiscal house in order if we could not come up with the cuts, the savings to do that, these cuts would be automatic. host: you are ok with them? guest: i don't like it. the republican house has proposed two alternatives where the sequester might be differently apportioned and there might be some other things like medical liability reform. i am for that, but the senator never took it up. p
years paramilitary operations had consumed a lot of resources, expertise, time, energy, and efforts at the cia. do you believe this has been at the expense of traditional cia responsibility collection, analysis? >> there have been opportunity costs because of the dedication of those resources. i would inventory our resources so they are being dedicated against a wide variety of strategic priorities to protect our country. in terms of operational collection activities worldwide, the analysis being done, what are we doing in these other areas? cyber -- are so many different areas. there is an intersection between counter-terrorism and these other areas. international organized crime. we want to optimize this resources so we can leverage capabilities we have to deal with these challenging issues across a very large globe. >> mr. brennan, you have devoted a great deal of your life to public service, for which i thank you. and you obviously understand the world of intelligence in a way that few people do. you have been an intelligence professional for much of your professional life. in t
about how we create jobs and help businesses grow and put ourselves on a path towards energy independence and that's not always an easy balancing act. but with enthusiasm and skill and dedication, that's exactly what ken salazar's done for the last four years. we were just reminiscing a little bit. i've known ken since we were both running for the senate together and became the only two incoming democrats in our senate class. pete remembers this. it was a lonely time. we actually lived in the same building when we first arrived in washington. and, ken, you'll recall, it was a little discouraging because basically everybody else that lived there was 20 or 25. so we were the two geriatrics in this building. but i came to appreciate quickly, not just him. not only did i come to appreciate his jump shot -- he's surprisingly quick on the court but also his patriotism and his belief that we have a responsibility to care for the land with which we've been blessed. it's not surprising that ken feels this way. his ancestors were living here before the mayflower set sail. as he explain
, credit, equity, commodity and energy. gfi group is a wholesale broker come sometimes called an interdealer broker. the rest of the industry go back over a century in the world's major financial centers. gfi has institutional clients in transacting exchange listed products and also operates exchanges for things that don't trade on traditional exchanges, instruments that are instead traded over-the-counter such as swaps and other derivative instruments. 15 months ago congress passed the dodd-frank act including title vii that requires when possible that stock transactions be cleared, reported and execute on exchanges, or swap execution facilities. congress recognized global swap workers won't be widely served by firms such as the gfi group. it was great to reflecting on standing role and recognize terms like gfi into the nod the new dodd-frank regulatory framework. the fec and the cftc are still at work on detailed regulations. that will impact the entire process of trading swap in the united states and abroad. getting those rules right now impact not just the large banks and
scorecard, which has been the nationally accepted yardstick to rate congress on environment and energy issues. welcome, sara. i thank each member of our panel for providing bio. we have david kirby from freedom works. he is vice president of development at freedom works. freedom works has done itself a great service with its name. it has to be one of the better organizational names around town. it works on a number of level. it produces freedom. freedom works. i say congratulations to you on that. we need something kind of crisp like that. david is vice president of development at freedom works managing their fundraising operations. he is also a policy analysis at the cato institute. he is the author of a number of publications and studies with regard to libertarian voting habits in the age of the obama administration and current politics. welcome, david. brandon davis, from the service employees international union, seiu. brandon is the national political director. seiu represents over 2 million workers in healthcare, public and, property services. brandon leads the organization's pol
is an expert on the energy and climate issues that are going to shape our future. >> ifill: sally jewell, c.e.o. of the outdoor recreation company, r.e.i., is president and so saying, president obama's pick for interior secretary, succeeding former colorado senator ken salazar. unlike other cabinet members, jewell comes to the job entirely without washington experience. with a background in business and as an oil industry engineer, and said she is humbled by the opportunity. >> i have a great job at r.e.i. today, but there's no role that compares, than the call to serve my country as secretary of the department of interior. >> ifill: jewell is only the fourth public announced nominee to fill seven second-term to fill 11 second-term cabinet vacancies. the major departures so far: treasury secretary timothy geithner, defense secretary leon panetta and secretary of state hillary clinton. only clinton's replacement john kerry has won senate confirmation and taken up his new post. the national security moves one step closer to completion with tomorrow's hearing for c.i.a. nominee john brennan. t
interfaces and navigation systems. we have sports and entertainment venues as well as a very large energy business. and these are things, shame on us, but we haven't made people well aware of even though we're a hundred years old. >> host: well, mr. taylor, we are aware of panasonic televisions, cameras, things like that. you've got a brand called your tv. what is that? >> guest: your tv is the latest innovation. people want their content the way they want it when they want it. they want to be able to communicate with each other, they want to use twitter, they want to see youtube, they want to shop. we're enabling that in a custom fashion on your tv. so we use facial recognition and voice recognition. you walk into a room, and you say my tv, and immediately the screen shows your home page. it's really the coolest thing. >> host: is it on the market? >> guest: it will be on the market this spring. >> host: 4k, oled. what are these terms? >> guest: so 4k is the latest innovation in terms of high resolution. it's four times the resolution of what you have on your hd-tv at home. it's got the
. we have sports and entertainment venues as well as a large energy business and these are things -- shame on us but we haven't made people will aware of them even though we are 100 years old. >> host: mr. taylor we are aware of panasonic televisions and panasonipanasoni c cameras and things like that. you have a brand called your tv. what does that mean? >> guest: your tv is the latest innovation. people want their content the way they wanted when they wanted. they want to be able to communicate with each other. they want to use twitter and they want to see youtube. they want to shop. we are enabling that in a custom fashion on your tv. so we use facial recognition and voice recognition. you walk into a room and you say, my tv and immediately the screen shows your homepage. it's really the coolest thing. >> host: is on the market? >> guest: it will be on the market this spring. >> host: oled and 4k, what do these terms mean? >> guest: is the latest term and high-resolution. 4k is four times the resolution of what you have on your hdtv at home. it's got the same qualities as digit
coal and what it could mean is greenpeace climate and energy campaigner kelly mitchell. welcome inside "the war room." >> thank you. >> jennifer: so why are mining companies moving to export coal overseas? >> right now is a pretty terrible time to be a coal industry executive. for decades it has been the major source of energy. but that is reversing, and that is a huge success story for people concerned about climate change and public health but that is a terrible reality for coal executives and their financiers. so now they are getting the stuff out of the u.s. and into emerging economies. >> jennifer: so is that why coal is now a dollar a ton? these companies are buying it for so cheap; is that why? >> that is sort of a scandal in of itself. the majority of coal is from an area called the power river basin, and most of that is federally owned coal, and the federal government is responsible for -- >> jennifer: wait, when you say federally owned coal, you are talking it is leased -- they go down, but it is on public lands. >> exactly. it is on public land
, two topics that you brought in -- the cloud and energy efficiency. what did you talk about? >> the reality is that they are both kind of related. the cloud allows ways to collect, store, and analyze data in ways that we have never done before. as we relate to energy, every device that plugs into your home can be connected to the cloud and send data. as we analyze the data, we have new ways to help you save energies in ways we never did possible before. we can manage the entire home electrical he in the most efficient way -- electrically in the most efficient way through the cloud. it presents other opportunities. the cloud is a big server. we have ways to analyze the data in a useful fashion. >> what about apps? >> we do not make any apps, but the great operating systems that are happened so that apps can be developed. you mentioned your tv earlier. it has an open architecture. that means apps developers can create apps for this tv. >> you are the first north american ceo -- correct? >> i am. >> what is it like merging the two cultures? >> i'm not sure if i want to answer t
was working in the world of energy and there i think we have taken enormous steps in the direction of a modern sustainable green economy, what we call now distributed generations of people producing and consuming energy. this is happening at an incredible pace in california and i know california like this is and we want to connect with california. some of the events will require the supports of the leaders that are here present, the leaders of the italian american associations. i am very proud to say that all of the leaders of the italian american associations are gathered today, mr. mayor, and senator assembly man and board of supervisors is here to celebrate with us and ramona blackwell who with the committee of the italians abroad and elected body and we will need your support and it's not just top down but bottom up. we're are open to your ideas and suggestions. we want it to a great celebration and people are in charge and in power and they will also run the show. that's our objective. by the way also have guests from outside california and salt lake city -- i don't know where he
-- sprinkles. the boundary has stalled out on top of us with a little energy which could squeeze out light rain showers this afternoon. 39 degrees at reagan national but but wind chill is down at 34, so still a little bit cooler. with the cloud cover, slow to warm up. traveling, things are pretty good up and down the east coast. we have our ribald delays leaving here headed to new york's city or newark, 30-60 minutes. also shower activity across the ghost -- gulf coast but the midsection is looking good. in addition to a few sprinkles flurries to the west of us throughout the day we are expecting cloudy skies and temperatures in the middle for a's. a little warmer in the seven-day forecast and things looking interesting for friday. i will explain coming up and another few minutes. >> thank you. today the senate just passed a bill to increase security at american embassies overseas. this morning's vote approved a measure to transfer a little more than $1 billion from a surplus of funds once intended for operations in iraq. it will be used to build a marine security guard posts and embassies that
be the next energy secretary. dagen: more on the power outage and the record-breaking at cbs sports for that incredible game. connell: and cyber attacks, the white house considering action against china. dagen: i had the ravens, did you? by a field goal, 27-24. connell: nobody knows football like dagen mcdowell. clearly. dagen: stocks now has to do every 15 minutes, nicole petallides at the new york stock exchange. nicole: a good bet going. if yo you're betting on the mar, 14,000 mark a little disappointed today, we are pulling back, dow jones industrials down 116 points right now. a majority of the dow components, 28 of the 30 were in the red, only two names, green arrows, there is ro rod-based selling going on, the retail stocks all with down arrows. some of this is coupled with number one, very far, very fast. and you have a strong dollar, worries of europe once again factoring in. and they look at oracle, up over 1%. down 1.6%. up over the $2 billion deal. obviously the equato acquirer cg in. dagen: energy attorney announced friday he will be leaving that post pending confirmati
employees wanted to do two things, make the world a better place to live and we can find that energy that people have without doing good work in the world, but doing it personally. secondly, we had high respect for rational decision-making and basing it on the facts. not invading the facts. being thoughtful and most importantly giving a clear sense of purpose. .. for everybody in this room and the vast majority of the people on this planet, the single biggest driver of self-esteem is your work because you spend a disproportionate amount of time, effort, and energy at work. that is what makes work important. that is why this issue about unemployment, and underemployment, is way more than economics. it is actually a very spiritual issue because work is spiritually important. i've said many times employee, you do your job well, it's far, far more important to give. you will never fool -- if you don't do your work the best you can do it, you will lower your self-esteem. if you're a college student, college isor work. if you don't do your work the best you can do it, you will lowerror sel
a five-year high as traders worried about political uncertainty in the eurozone and watched energy prices sink yet again. some context. the dow roared because 14,000 last week but has retreated 133 so far today. >> then there's this before we wrap things up. we'll start at the end of this story. police in lincoln, nebraska, recently arrested a 19-year-old man on suspicion he drew marijuana. they made the arrest after they found equipment and pot used in grow operations in his home. why were the police in his home? because he let them in and why did he let them in? because he called police earlier in the day to report that two strangers forced their way into his home and stole two pipes. so just bring the cops in. what is this? this is my garden. smells a little different. stupid is as stupid does. see you back here tonight on fox report, and until then, have a great afternoon. captioned by closed captioning services inc. >> they nation's debt blowing past 16-1/2 trillion dollars today. is this any time for the president to be blowing another budget deadline? i'm in for have no could --
. energy has been the leading sector in this recent rally. so are these still -- these stocks still a hot play or are they too hot to handle now? if you thought profits were the thing that is the only thing that ceos cared about, think again. we will tell what you is keeping top guys and girls up at night. my partner sue is up at the stock exchange. sue? >> hi, ty. money-losing u.s. postal service is ending saturday delivery of first class mail. all in an effort to trim costs. postmaster general speaking to cnbc about the move and ramifications for you and for business. pearson is in washington with the plan and political fall out. hampton, you're up first. >> losing about $36 million a day, cutting saturday first class delivery will save about $2 billion a year. it is really the best short term option right now for the postal service with losing $16 billion last year np in the past, congressman dated six day service. but right now, because the government is running on a temporary continuing resolution, that is opening the door for the postal service to act. >> it's our interpretation tha
oamerica's den oil could be numbered. >> reporter: the u.s. has discover energy than it thought it had. some talk about north american energy independence. >> we could make opec n0pec. the reason, advances in technology such as fracking, horizohorizontal drilling and or improvements which increase natural gas production by 27% in just four years, making the u.s. number one in gas with oil on its way. >> we're talking decades, if not into the hundreds of years of supply in north america. >> it's been estimated by the energy information agency that we could be the number one oil producer in the world by 2020, surpassing saudi arabia, so this is a big deal. it's a game-changing opportunity, and it's of historic proportions. >> reporter: even though who share the administration desire to reduce the use the petro chemicals acknowledge projections that the u.s. will produce one-third more of its own oil by 2020. 1 analyst said self reliance must include alternatives such as wind, solar, and more. >> we can reduce our dependence on foreign oil by shifting to electric vehicles and investing in
respectively. but toyota jumped 2.9% to a new 52 week high. meantime, two energy giants reported strong fourth quarter profits. exxon earnings were 20 cents per share above estimates even though energy production dropped. chevron also had better than expected fourth quarter earnings per share, 24 cents above estimates. it was helped by refining cheaper oil, leading to higher profit margins. chevron shares saw the bigger boost, up 1.2%. exxon gained a fraction. four of the five most actively traded exchange traded funds were up. the s&p 500 volatility note fell more than 5%, as it usually moves in the opposite direction of the market. and that's tonight's market focus. >> tom: despite the rise in the unemployment rate in january, our friday market monitor thinks the u.s. economy is gaining strength. heather brilliant is the global equity research director morningstar. heather is with us from chicago. still tepid job growth here, healther so what gives you confidence that not only is the economy growth but strength is gathering momentum? >> i think there is a lot of improvement on the manufactur
, energy. we can't talk about energy in america or the world without that connecting to the environment. and you can't talk about the environment without talking about energy. and you can't talk about energy and the environment without talking about the economy. because it's job withs, it's growth -- it's jobs, it's growth, a nation's competitive position in the world. and so these issues are interrelated. and as my friends who are here representing their country, their people in america's capital tonight, they understand this, and they understand that the great global issues facing us all -- all 6.5 billion people on the face of the earth today -- are, in fact, global. we live in a global community. that global community is underpinned by a global economy. and so whatever framework of challenges you think we face, they are international. proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, the environment, energy, terrorism, extremism and maybe the most insidious of all, despair. and within the framework of despair comes hunger and poverty and when man is without dignity, not much else matter
,000 mark for the first time in five years. but how does exxonmobil and chevron, two down energy stocks, and what is their impact on the move. josh lipton is with us. hi, josh. >> each sector has had a different role in the push it 14,000. first up, exxon which beat expectations on the bottom line on strong results and its chemical and refining businesses. but the oil giant also told us that it produced less oil and gas than it said it would back in march. stock right now, basically flat but since the peak in 2 thu 7, energy giant is actually down about 3% of the 880-something point we tacked on in 2013. exxon only contributed 26 points. then chevron, better than expected fourth quarter earnings as its refining business boosted profits. stock right now showing modest gains. but a better long-term story here. chevron is actually up about 24% since october 2007 and has added 60 points to this year's surge. worth noting, the role of the energy sector has also played in this broader rally between 2009 and 2013. energy lagged one of the reasons for nervousness last year, investors anticipate
. finally, i became a ping pong master while recording my debut album. how you ask? with 5-hour energy. i get hours of energy now -- no crash later. wait to see the next five hours. >> on the day we found out dell is taking itself private, it is worth remembering that 15 years ago, dell was among the hottest tech stocks out there. these days you don't want to hear about dell. if it goes public again, it will be more styling with the times. when it comes to tech, you want to hear about the companies that represent the future not the past. stocks with momentum. tonight, we are going off the charts with the help of bob lyon, doing well for us. the founder and senior strategist and my colleague at thestreet.com. he works with me on the realmoney.com pay site. the four names are fang. fang. fang for short. these are the stocks that seem to be moving higher of late. what is fang? facebook, amazon netflix and google. they all take major bites out of the bears. fang was also the dog on "get smart." as we approach one of the most important days of the year for the stock market, my birthday. if you
of energy to the north, kind of storm number one. storm number two going to wallop new england. around here you'll need the heavier coats with temperatures in the mid 20s from fredricksburg to gaithersburg. la plata and manassas 25. we're hovering at 33 at reagan national. here's monika samtani with time saferrer traffic -- timesaver traffic. volumes picking up. >>> absolutely. the incident we're talking about is a four-car accident. it's before georgia avenue along the left side of the roadway. we were on the known with maryland state police. they're telling us they need to move the cars to the right shoulder so she may have to close the lanes for a bit westbound 495 you see that slow traffic forming there in silver spring as well. let's take a live look and show what you it looks like first of all at university boulevard. you can see that traffic is jammed here. now we'll go to the next camera shot and if you're planning to head here in new carrollton heading around toward the outer loop and 95, you'll be okay. the brake lights are beginning closer to new hampshire avenue. you saw that he
hundred e-mail accounts hit after the department of energy. the u.s. has made little progress in the negotiations with china to stop the cack it denies it's behind. >> they are our number one adversary, whether you think militarily in the cyberdomain, economic, when you look at economic espionage, chine china is our biggest threat. >> now the u.s. is considering new economic and diplomatic steps to fight chinese hacking according to fortunately times. that will include more information sharing between washington and private companies to protect critical systems and infrastructure like power grids and communications systems. administration officials won't comment on the specific cybersecurity plan. eric? >> peter, we'll leave it there. a growing problem in america. >>> the government promised a most energy efficient super bowl ever. then this happens. any coincidence? and don't feel like shopping -- become a mailman. [ male announcer ] wouldn't it be cool if we took the nissan altima and reimagined nearly everything in it? gave it greater horsepower and class-leading 38 mpg hig
are faulty. energy research firm saying washington is lowballing the amount of cash and jobs more drilling here would generate. daniel, can you give us ballpark numbers you're talking about what drilling would add to the u.s. economy in terms of tax revenues and revenues overall? >> you bet. most people are familiar with what is going on in north dakota, down in texas and louisiana and around the country where we are producing private land. government land 96% are basically untouched and what it could mean is in excess of $450 billion per year in gdp growth, and 20 times as much as the government is talking the ministrations talking about in terms of increased energy taxes. we have been putting people to work, building infrastructure, it is a win-win-win deal. alalbany does the government to step out of the way and let people go to work. liz: instead of drill, baby, drill, demonstrators are talking about draw, baby, draw. we have the boxer shell, reservoir two times the size of a country of oil. what is that in compass? is it just drilling were all sorts of jobs and gdp growth? tell me wha
give life, you know, give birth, men have the destructive energy, the destructive force and women might not be able to, you know, pull the trigger. of course, arguments about what about pms, would women be able to act rationally during that period? [laughter] would they be somewhat immobilized? how are they going to have supplies in the battle? are they going to have instead of, you know, cartridges in their belt, are they going to have tampons? [laughter] now it seems antiquated. it was the '90s which doesn't feel, i don't feel that old, but -- [laughter] these were common arguments. and sometimes what was guidance got sort of twisted into policies or practices that really sort of undermined the integration of women. for example, in the army there was guidance that, you know, for healthful purposes women should shower every 72 hours. but then i was in a number of units where somehow that was taken as policy x they said women can't be in combat because women must have showers every 72 hours. [laughter] and there are places where i visited where they were doing extended training exercise
center for energy this was pretty hot halftime show. this happened after that. do you think beyonce had anything to do with this in your expert opinion? >> well it is hard to tell right now. very well could have. i guess we'll have to look at the sequence of events to see when the power outage actually occurred and when the show actually ended and how much stress anything from that show may have put on the electrical infrastructure within the super boehm but right now there really isn't enough evidence to suggest either way that it was caused by the electrical stresses from that show or not. >> there was a lot of energy, certainly during that show. >> yeah. jenna: there is a joint statement released by entergy, new orleans, the power provider to the stadium superdome, the superdome operator. could you translate this for us this is jar most don't understand. a piece of equipment designed to monitor electrical load sensed an be a normality in the system. wins the issue was detected the sensing equipment operated as designed and opened a breaker causing power to be partially cut. what does
businesses grow and put ourselves on a path towards energy independence. and that's not always an easy balancing act. but with enthusiasm and skill and dedication, that's exactly what ken salazar's done over the last four years. we were just reminiscing a little bit. i've known ken since we were both running for the senate together. and became the only two incoming democrats in our senate class, people ras remembers this, it was a lonely time. we actually lived in the same building when we first arrived in washington, and ken, you'll recall, it was a little discouraging because basically everybody else who lived there was 20 or 25. so we were the two geriatrics in this building. but i came to appreciate quickly not just his friendship, which if you have ken salazar as a friend, you've got a real friend. not only did i come to appreciate his jump shot, he is surprisingly quick on the court, but also his patriotism and his belief that we have got a responsibility to care for the land with which we have been blessed. and it is not surprising that ken feels this way, after all, his ancesto
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